ducks

Weird beach junk

Have you ever gone swimming with 28,000 rubber ducks?

It isn’t just messages in bottles washing up on shore these days. Our oceans are huge and full of mystery. They’re also getting busier with shipping traffic, and unfortunately junk sometimes spills overboard. What’s washing up on the beach these days?

Rubber ducks

rubber duck on the beach

In 1992, a crate of 28,000 rubber ducks fell overboard and soon started appearing on beaches around the world. Even today people across the globe, including Newfoundland, South America and Hawaii, are still finding them. Some of these ducks have even been found frozen in Arctic ice!

Bananas

banane

After six containers of bananas fell off a cargo ship into the ocean, they started washing up on the shores of the Dutch North Sea island of Terschelling. Residents of the island were surprised to find thousands of unripe bananas scattered across the beach.

Giant Squid


the-tentacles-of-the-octopus-wallpaper-2560x1600

Back in 2005, giant squid began to show up on the shores of Newport Beach in California. These mammoths of the sea, thought to be Humboldt squid, usually live in deeper waters, but experts speculated that the squids might have been trying to go after bait fish too close to shore.

Lego

Lego-on-Beach-Kent-News-Pictures-Ltd

In 1997, a container ship called the Tokio Express was hit with an enormous wave off the coast of England, and almost five million pieces of its cargo spilled into the sea. What was that cargo? Lego pieces! Coastal residents of north and south Cornwall, England have been finding thousands of Lego pieces ever since.

Have you ever found something strange at the beach?

Sam Landa edits the 1-800-GOT-JUNK? blog and is Content Manager and social media manager at 1-800-GOT-JUNK?. She has a Bachelor’s degree in Environment & Sustainability, and in her spare time, she enjoys playing live music and writing. Connect with Sam on  or LinkedIn.

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